All About Hyper Tendril Peas

Hypertendril Peas collage

One of the most exciting things going on in my pea garden this year has to be my hyper tendril peas. I am so excited to try out peas with a different growth habit. Instead of some of the leaves, the peas will produce more tendrils. The two varieties I am going to highlight in this post are the Spring Blush Tendril pea and Magnolia Blossom Tendril pea.

I could tell right from the get go something was different about these peas. Check out these photos when the peas were just starting to grow.

Even as the peas were sprouting you could already see tendrils shooting off at the top of the plant. Typically you don't see tendrils until the plants mature a lot more.
Even as the peas were sprouting you could already see tendrils shooting off at the top of the plant. Typically you don’t see tendrils until the plants mature a lot more. This is the Spring Blush variety.
This is a Magnolia Blossom Pea. Again with this variety you can already see some tendrils beginning to grow even at this young stage.
This is a Magnolia Blossom Pea. Again with this variety you can already see some tendrils beginning to grow even at this young stage.
This is the Spring Blush pea again, after several more weeks of growth. As you can see the tendrils are growing wildly and have got themselves all tangled up.
This is the Spring Blush pea. As you can see the tendrils are growing wildly and have got themselves all tangled up.
Here again is the Magnolia Blossom Tendril Pea.  It too is producing tendrils like crazy.
The variety is this photo is the Magnolia Blossom Tendril Pea. It too is producing tendrils like crazy.

Don’t just take my word for it, on how cool these hypertendril varieties are. Here is a video of my daughters sharing their thoughts on them, particularly the Spring Blush variety –

Look at all those tendrils. Best part about them is that you can harvest them and eat them. I wasn’t sure how to harvest them, so I contact the man who is responsible for breeding this varieties, Dr. Alan Kapular. I was very impressed how fast he got back to me. He said you can harvest some of the hypertendrils without having an impact on the pea production, particularly if you are soil is fertile. He recommends eating the tendrils when they are young. Based on the advice he game me I am going to experiment for myself and harvest a little bit at a time and see how the plants do. I want to find that perfect balance between being able to enjoy the tendrils and getting a significant crop of peas. Stay tuned for more updates!

I want to extend a huge thanks to Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds for providing these exciting varieties in their catalog this year. And an even bigger thank you to Dr. Alan Kapular for developing these new varieties and sharing them with the world.

4 Comment

  1. I planted they Magnolia Blossom Tendril Pea this year. I found that it did not produce as well as the ‘plain’ Magnolia Blossom Pea that I planted last year. I will probably use up what I have and then go back to the regular Magnolia Blossom.

    1. samue1eb@yahoo.com says:

      I did not know there were different Magnolia Blossom. Interesting. Mine are still growing, so I haven’t seen how well they will produce. I will post on here when they have produced.

  2. […] is from a friend of mine’s garden. I shared with him some Spring Blush pea seeds. This is hypertendril variety. Plenty of tendrils to grab a hold of what ever is […]

  3. […] wanted to share with you this afternoon on update on how my hypertendril varieties are doing. They are growing really tall and beginning to flower. They are quite sturdy plants with […]

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